Writing Assignment 3: Write 350-500 words on one of the following
prompts. The reply to one member of the class (3-4 sentence response). Please
choose one of the following:

1. In Toni Cade Bambara's "The Lesson," Miss Moore states, "Where we
are is who we are." To what extent do you agree? Do you consider yourself the
product of your social class? What factors have contributed to your identity?
(p. 604)
  2. In Gary Soto's "Black Hair," what associations, emotions,
or attitudes toward illegal immigrants do you bring to your reading of the text?
  Use examples from the text to support your statements.
  (p. 632)
3.
In Eric Liu's "Chinaman's Chance: Reflections on the American Dream," what
concepts, experiences, associations, or images of the American Dream can you
bring to the reading of the text? (p. 639)
4. Write a reflection on the  impact any of the three stories we have read this week. Include a minimum of 2 quotes to support your statements.
 


Comments

Marco Martin
02/20/2013 21:01

In Eric Liu's "Chinaman's Chance: Reflections on the American Dream," what
concepts, experiences, associations, or images of the American Dream can you
bring to the reading of the text? (p. 639)


This is an analysis of “achinamans chance.” In order to explain the significance of the American dream, identity and culture in this literary work. The significance o the American dream, is to show the reader that the American dream has taking on a different meaning from what our parents knew the American dream to be lots of immigrated families came to America in search of the American dream freedom and opportunity . Today the younger generation whether of immigrant or 100% American all fell the need of entitlement. A miss conception of the American dream, every man for himself the first one to the top wins like life is a contest and whoever wins get more money. The American dream is not about who has the most money, but what people can do to make sure America is the country with the most money and opportunities for its citizens.
The significance of identity is to show the peacher that you don’t have to be a full American at all to believe in the American dream. It was to show how a person identity should be need from the inside. He identified himself as an American not a chairman even though he was Chinese. A person’s identity is not defined by other person perspective, or by person views.
Culture is significant in a sense that, a person should be open minded of other cultures, it is ok for a person to embrace another one culture and belied but a person should always have knowledge of one’s own culture and beliefs. To embrace another ones culture before fully understanding your own, can lead to a person not having a true identity. Not know where you’re from leads to one not knowing were then going. A person must have a good understanding of these things to accomplish the American dream.

Reply
Bonnie Posey
02/24/2013 14:24

I enjoyed reading your paper and on the different points you addressed. I agree with what you wrote especially on how the American dream is not what it was before now, I especially liked your last paragraph addressing ones culture etc... So true. If one does not know their culture, one will struggle with their identity. Thanks for sharing.

Reply
Nicole Nichols
02/25/2013 04:16

Marco,
The younger generation, it is always the younger generation. I happen to agree that there is something about this generation that stands out. As a parent, I'm worried that my sons will not be able to surpass the standard of living that was provided to them. I will not lower my expectation to make it easier for them. That's what society has done. We've crippled our children through unnecessary kindness.

Regards,
Nicole

One example come to mind.
My oldest was competing in a football (soccer) tournament which was hosting several tourneys. We were in Germany at the time and he played for a German team. My son finished 3rd in his competition. I was in between fields and had the opportunity to notice all the American children received little trophies. My son commented on it later because his 3rd place got a handshake and applause for effort. America gave trophies just for showing up. His German friends laughed at us.

Reply
Tasha Urena-Arredondo
02/26/2013 09:16

Nicole, I agree with your comment on what you said about crippling our children through unnecessary kindness. The standard of or children will be way better than ours howeever I dont think that their will be such an appreciation by our children as we had for our parents. We grew up in a non technological era when mandatory face to face interaction was required to obtain what we wanted. Our children have it easy and it will get get a lot easier for them.

Sandy Strauss
02/25/2013 12:06

I enjoyed your analytical response to Eric Liu's "Chinaman's Chance: Reflections on the American Dream." Your message was very well articulated and provided a very intellegent viewpoint.Your response was thought engaging and actually made me want to read this essay again! Your response details the message that I also agree, that the author was trying to convey within his essay. Your reponse also shows that you spent time pondering the question of what the "American Dream" truly signifies. Well done and great job with articulating your viewpoint!

Reply
Bonnie Posey
02/24/2013 14:17

Write an analysis of " The Things They Carried." Describe the images of war and how different types of coping mechanisms were used to get through the war.

In the story "The Things They Carried,"there are many different characters. The setting is during the Vietnam War. The men portrayed are led by Lt. Jimmy Cross. The narrator is identified as Tim O'Brien. Lt. Cross was in charge of Alpha Company. However, he was a weak leader. His training did not prepare him for the responsibilities he was given. Lt. Cross sets himself apart from others and is emotionally unable to lead his Company. He carries a picture of a woman he loves and fantasizes about who does not love him. His way of dealing with the pressures of war are by imagining he is back home with her. Bowler believed men showed their courage by the amount of medals they receive. Kiowas death was very traumatic for him though and he began self loathing himself for surviving. Boker could not deal with the atrocities of war and killed himself. Tim O'Brien is the writer, narrator and a soldier.As a youngster, O'Brien learned how to accept death and now that he is an adult, he is trying to remember how little Timmy did it. As a writer, O'Brien reflects on the past by writing. Kiowa was the most emotional soldier in the Company. He helped O'Brien adjust to Vietnam and consoled him when he killed someone. Everyone confided in Kiowa.Rat Riley is the medic of the company. He always had something to talk about. He also shows us how much a man can take by shooting himself in the foot when he needed a way out. He becomes paranoid and the visions he has are due to his fears. Ted Lavender escaped the war by drug abuse. He dies in the war. All the men had something they carried: good luck charm, diary,photo etc... However, they carried so much more than the Army equipment and mementos. They carried their fear and insecurities as well as guilt for surviving. Many had to deal with killing the enemy. The emotional baggage they carried was much heavier than the equipment they carried. The soldiers laid down the equipment after the war and never picked it up again. However, the emotional baggage they carried stayed with them for the rest of their lives.

Reply
Heather Dixon :)
02/24/2013 17:20

In response to Bonnie:

As you mentioned in your response, all the characters had different ways of coping with the war. Lt. Jimmy Cross carried a picture around of the women he loves (Martha) and had various fantasies of her as a coping mechanism for the war. Dave Jensen dealt with the war by trying to be as normal as possible. He didn’t forget to do ‘normal’ things while at war such as bringing toothpaste, extra socks, floss and so on. Usually you would worry about more important things such as extra ammo, or medical kits, and not about hygiene. Ted Lavender dealt with the war by doing drugs. The images that are used in this story help you ‘see’ what they have to. You got a sense of what each man was responsible for and what they has to carry, and how much it weighed.

Word count: 148

Reply
yosbel perez
02/26/2013 06:51

I like how you expressed your analysis of the story “The Things they Carried” The different mental coping mechanisms where well described in your response. Everyone carries some type of baggage with them, whether in their mind of on their person. A little reminder of what their life is like away from the horrors of war. Almost like a time machine or teleportation device that allows them to remove their mind from the harsh reality.

Reply
Heather Sixon :)
02/24/2013 17:08

Writing Assignment 3:
4. Write a reflection on the impact any of the three stories we have read this week. Include a minimum of 2 quotes to support your statements. (Question from you blog Website)

1. Write an analysis of “A Chinaman’s Chance.” Explain the significance of the American Dream, identity, and culture. (Question From the paper booklet of homework you handed out in the beginning of the year)

****** Didn’t know what questions we should do, seeing how the website and the paper handout had different questions so I combined the 2 above as my response.******

“A Chinaman’s Chance” by Eric Liu is about how he still believes in the American dream, and how it signifies a possibility to have a better life if one tries to achieve/believe in it. In Gillespie, S., Pipolo, T., & Fonseca, T. (2008) he is quoted saying that “…the American dream is about prosperity and the pursuit of material happiness” (pg. 633). He goes on to say that “it represents a sense of opportunity that binds generations together in commitment…” (Gillespie, S., Pipolo, T., & Fonseca, T., 2008, pg. 633). Liu says that “our country was built on…the idea that everybody deserves a fair shot….[of] the original American Dream. … it was this idea….that drew every immigrant here” like his parents. (Gillespie, S., Pipolo, T., & Fonseca, T., 2008, pg. 638).Liu goes on to say throughout his story of how America can bring opportunities. He gives the true example of how his parents emigrated from their home country China to come to America for a better life. He says that through their efforts and hardships, he achieved going to any Ivy League school; something his parents could never do. The American Dreams offer people the chance to have a better life than the one they are living, or of the generation that came before them. Identity and culture are important in achieving the American dream because everyone who came to America were immigrants from different backgrounds who wanted to forge their way into this world to have a better life for themselves and the generations to come. Liu says that “…every generation will reach for success, and often miss the mark. But Americans rely as much on the next generation as on the next life to prove that such struggles and frustrations are not in vain. [They] stick with racial and religious comrades” to help them achieve this American dream(Gillespie, S., Pipolo, T., & Fonseca, T., 2008, pg. 633, 636).the American dreams provides the opportunity for a second chance at having a better life for some. For others it provides a way for one to elevate themselves to a higher standing of social position and/or wealth. It’s a chance for the next generation to make themselves become someone.

WORD COUNT: 368

Source:
Gillespie, S., Pipolo, T., & Fonseca, T. (2008). Literature across cultures. (5th ed., pp. 633-640).

Reply
Mackenson Pierre
02/26/2013 17:59

I must say I agree with the way you analyze the story. if I did not read the story it would help me understand the theme of the story.you even give the sources of where the information is, well done.

Reply
Kristen Letcher
02/24/2013 17:44




1. In Toni Cade Bambara's "The Lesson," Miss Moore states, "Where we are is who we are." To what extent do you agree? Do you consider yourself the product of your social class? What factors have contributed to your identity? (p. 604)


In the story “The Lesson” Miss Moore states “ Where we are is who we are” In my opinion, what Ms. Moore means is that people's lives and personalities are shaped by the circumstances and surroundings in which they live. I agree with Miss. Moore to some extent, I do think people change and turn into a product of their environment, but I always feel that if someone doesn’t have all the money, that doesn’t make them any less of a person then someone with money. People can be living paycheck-to-paycheck and just getting by, or not living in a good area, but have more class and respect then someone who doesn’t have to work as hard for what they have. People that don’t have it easy with money seem to have more respect for others and the things they do have. Just due to the fact that they work so hard for the things they do have. I don’t feel I am a product of a social class. My father raised my two brothers and I and we did not have much money growing up. My father was a single father of three and worked two jobs to give us things, and to support us and provide for us. I there fore became a mother figure to my brothers at a young age and took on the responsibility to help out my father which I feel has made me a stronger woman and thankful for the things I had and have today. Now married and doing well, even though I enjoy nice things, I don’t see my family or myself any better then the next. I am thankful for what we have and thankful for the fact I can give my kids more then what I had growing up. I feel it all depends on the way the person was raised. If they came from money and everything was always given to them, those people tend to have less respect for others and there surrounding’s and spend money on things that doesn’t make since to someone without. A person growing up without money and then coming into money, some tend to have more respect and not feed into the social class as much, but there are some people that it goes straight to their head and become a different person because their surrounds and circumstances of living has changed. In this story I feel it is a good lesson for the children to see what else is out there in the world, but to be thankful for the things they do have, and also to remember to never to give up on a dream, strive for the best, and always try to reach for the stars.

Reply
Kodi Mirabelli
02/24/2013 19:41

Kristen, I agree with your opinion on the lesson Miss Moore teaches to the children. Although one may grow up in a specific household or were raised on a budget, it does not have to define who one can become. Anyone can be successful in life, it just takes some time and effort.

Reply
Kodi Mirabelli
02/24/2013 19:30

In “A Chinaman’s Chance,” by Eric Liu, the idea of letting go of old traditions and going for the American dream is a prevalent theme in this work of literature. The American dream described in this story is about one that can be passed one from generation to generation. Liu describes the American dream as something that must take hard work and perseverance. Liu says, “My conception of the American Dream does not take progress for granted.(Liu, 1994)” He is describing a concept that the dream of being able to have financial indepence and security should not be something that is looked down upon but rather a goal to strive towards. Older generations may frown upon the ideals of looking towards a brighter future but this is not something Liu believes should be tolerated. In “A Chinaman’s Chance,” the speaker is not proud of his heritage and does not even identify as a Chinese American. This shows that the significance of his culture and heritage is dwindling in comparison to what he wishes to be. Upon attending Yale, the speaker is brought into a whole new world of intellectually stimulating conversation and a way to take a step back from his embarrassment of being a Chinese man. In “A Chinaman’s Chance,” the speaker fears the retaliation of his sister when he realizes that she might view him as being someone who is hateful of their culture and self. Although she speaker believes in equal opportunity and pushing for what you want, he does not want to be portrayed as someone who has so much self-loathing that he is willing to change so much about himself. When the speaker is describing how his sister used to call him a “banana,” and recollecting an article he read about a Korean man who ran for congress and tried to change his accent, he suddenly realizes that there is a reason for the speaker’s sister’s tormenting. The speaker says, “I winced at his palpable self-hate. But then it hit me: Is this how my sister sees me?” Eric Liu provides excellent insight into the mind of the speaker and shows that the American Dream can be fulfilled with the right attitude and perseverance.

Reply
Nicole Nichols
02/24/2013 19:45

In “The Red Sweater”, “Dead Men's Path” and “A Chinaman's Chance”, tolerance of people, heritage and tradition are common. Heritage is demonstrated to be of import whether it belongs to you or someone else. Each story asks for or suggest some needed change.

“The Red Sweater” was a story of Chinese immigrant sisters and their family. The sisters meet during the January – February time frame. The sisters reminiscence about their childhood and the relationship of their parents. The oldest sister, Lisa, cannot keep hold of happiness. She is the most beautiful of the three daughters. It is important to not she exited university one class shy of a bachelor's degree. The middle sister committed suicide. The youngest daughter also escaped the parents. She let an altercation with her parents escalate until she was excommunicated from the family. She is not received by the parents and that suits her inclination. She is only aware of parental news through her sister. Having achieved her freedom from the parental units, she wants nothing but happiness for her sister. “Time is what I would like to give her,” says the sister. Lisa has fallen into a care-giver role involving her frequently with her parents.

“Dead Men's Path” told a story of an ambitious and modern thinking missionary named Mr. Obi. Mr. Obi had been selected for a headmaster position at a school, I believe to be in Africa, which would benefit from his new ideas. He comes with a wife who envisions herself establishing a beautiful garden to compliment the innovative works of her husband. Mr. Obi goes into the school and makes changes regarding access to a pathway crossing school property used by local villagers. He blocks it and makes it inaccessible. The village priest pays a visit to the young new schoolmaster and asks that the traditional path be respected and reopened to the villagers. Mr. Obi did not oblige the priest and found part of his school and garden in ruins shortly there-after. A school examiner that had been expected saw the devastation and reported the headmaster to be naïve. Disrespecting history or another's culture is usually not the smart move. This was not his culture and he gave no credence to their claim. As the priest always said, “let the hawk perch and let the eagle perch.”

“A Chinaman's Chance” relates the experiences and feelings of a son of Chinese immigrants. His viewpoints concerning childhood cultural embarrassment are fairly typical of children trying to fit in. He turned his back on community Chinese school and was embarrassed by his father's accented English. An opportunity to experience USMC OCS. He was impressed with “the color-blind equality of opportunity that the rest of society struggles to match.” Hope is expressed for the country and his generation's responsibility and challenges. The need to consult other generations is expressed as is the observation that we must prepare our children for the future.
Word count: 489

Reply
Marco Martin
02/24/2013 23:07

Nicole you have a good analysis on the literary works. I agree with your main points on heritage throughout the 3 readings. Ones heritage should be imbraced not embarresed of ,and should be passed on from generation to generation.

Reply
Alex Alexis
02/25/2013 07:44

The story The lesson is a very powerful reading when you think about where you came from. and now that you have move on past you past life styles. miss moore i argee. But on the other hand we our who we are and we can not change that unless we make a serious. now some folks need to wake up and see whether they are a product of this social class. like they say you are either apart of the promblem are you are the promblem. back when i was a kid it was not easy helping and watching ove my life and. Some people in the social class are very good on respect and saying thank you for the things they have. For me and my family we thank god for everything we have just because there are people from the past and today that suffer from just the little things that we take for granted, and its sad how people fight over who has what and more when its best to come together and be equal this story brings me back to runagate, runagate. on how things should be equal and not for just one class of people because dividing people into groups causes a great issue same as separating family members. People without money do not have it easy where as people with money do have respect and get respect just cause they have money. The lesson shows us many ways people can turn from their ways and stay in their ways if the don't get over their ego about be up class. So my opinion on miss moore is wether you can from a bad area are was raised in hard environment. We are who we are no matter what people say we can shape our self's to be better as long as we remember where we are from our roots. That were enriched in our childhood,teenage,adult lives.

Reply
Kristen Letcher
02/25/2013 15:31

Alex I agree with you that people are who they are because it was the way they were brought up and they don't know any different. The sad thing about todays world is some people that do come into money do forget where they came from and what they went through to get there. Because they get lost in the social class and think they have to live up to what the next person with money has. Todays world seems that everyone always has to be better then the next person but in reality no one person is better because they may have a nicer car, house or more money then a person that struggles daily to have the things they need.

Reply
sandy Strauss
02/25/2013 12:00

“The Things They Carried,” was a story set in the middle of the Vietnam War. The significance of the title signifies the weight that these soldiers carried mentally, physically, and spiritually. The mental anguish that these soldiers endured was depicted in the details of the “weight” that they individually carried. The author writes about the “weight” of different objects, or issues throughout the story. The men decided what they would each carry based on a physical and mental necessity. Each man carried different items other than the necessities of their ranks within the military.
“They all carried what they could bear, and then some, including a silent awe for the terrible power of the things they carried.”
Some men carried extra weight because of superstition,
“Lieutenant Cross carried a pebble given to him by his beloved Martha. Dave Jensen carried a rabbits foot. Norman Baker, otherwise a very gentle person, carried a thumb that had been given to him as a gift by Mitchell Sanders.”
The author is repetitive in his writing, and uses profanity to show the brutality of war. The numbness that some of these soldiers feel is a coping mechanism of being a soldier. The tone is heavy and very descriptive. Lt. Cross has an obsession for a girl named, Martha. Martha is not a girlfriend, or even a lover. She is a friend that writes him and talks about life back home in the United States. Martha never asks about the war or insinuates there is ever a personal relationship going on between her and Lt. Cross. She sends him photographs that he carries, along with the letters that are protected in his rucksack. Martha is a way for Lt. Cross to deal with the harshness of the war. Martha is a way for Cross to escape on a personal level and fantasize about something other than surviving the war. Cross hoped that one day he and Martha could be more than just pen pals. He fantasizes about her constantly.
“He would sometimes taste the envelope flaps, knowing that her tongue had been there.”
Ted Lavender was a nervous soldier. He carried tranquilizers and dope; among all the other “necessities.” Lavender smoked dope to cope with his nerves and because he was scared. Lavender gets shot in the head after urinating during a mission; and Cross blames himself. Lt. Cross believes that if he had not spent so much time obsessing over Martha, that he would have paid more attention to his men. Cross felt shame and guilt over Lavender dying. When the author describes the environment after Lavender dies. The “weight” of the situation is described with Kiowa’s recollection of how heavy Lavender fell to his death.
“Like cement, Kiowa whispered in the dark. I swear to God-boom-down. Not a word.
I’ve heard this, said Norman Bowker.
A pisser you know? Still zipping himself up. Zapped while zipping.
All right fine. That’s enough.
Yeah, but you had to see it, the guy just-
I heard, man. Cement. So why not shut the fuck up?“

Kiowa was describing the weight of Lavender as he fell to the f=ground after being shot. He compared it to the hardness of cement.
The death of Ted Lavender changes Lt. Cross and his mental mind set. Cross goes from one extent to the other after Lavender dies. He goes from being distracted by the obsession over Martha, to making sure everyone is following their orders. Cross burns his letters and photos of Martha and comes to the realization that it was all a fascination in his mind. He decides that carrying the weight of obsessing over Martha is not good for him, and has proven unsafe for him mentally and physically. This story is about the ugliness of war, and the way these soldiers coped just to survive. The story also talks about a male bravado and the way men act around each other to get through without evoking the emotions they are truly feeling.

Reply
Alexandra Geller
02/25/2013 19:15

I really enjoyed your in-depth analysis of the story. I especially like the way in which you used quotations to provide solid examples of the different coping mechanisms that the soldiers used. I also found it very interesting when you discussed the "weight" of the situation when Lavender died- I hadn't noticed that link before reading your analysis. Good job! :)

Reply
Alexandra Geller
02/25/2013 19:01

Prompt: Write an analysis of " The Things They Carried." Describe the images of war and how different types of coping mechanisms were used to get through the war.


In Tim O'Brien's “The Things They Carried”, he describes the details of warfare in Vietnam on a battlefield for a young Lieutenant, Lieutenant Jimmy Cross, and for his men. He also discusses, in detail, the things that the men must carry with them on their person. The title, “The Things They Carried”, is symbolic of both the mental burdens, as well as the physical burdens, that the soldiers must carry with them. The story also lends insight into what is constantly on Lieutenant Cross’s mind; a girl named Martha, who he is infatuated with. He thinks about her often, and in his mind, he recounts the way she looks in great detail.
Throughout the story, many different images of war, battle and bloodshed are described. O’Brien describes such things as the gruesome death of one of the soldiers, Ted Lavender; how he was “shot in the head”, his “teeth were broken” and “cheekbone was gone”. The weapons are also depicted in great detail, as is the weight of the weapons and all of the soldiers’ gear. Images of diseases, infections, and the dirt that covered the men are also provided; “a powdery orange-red dust that covered their boots and fatigues and faces”. The soldiers exhaustion is illustrated; the story discusses their “aching bodies” and the fact that they “moved like mules”, which conveys images of them fatigued and exhausted.
As well, the author describes many different coping mechanisms that the soldiers use to distract themselves from their harsh realities on the battlefield. Some of these mechanisms include daydreaming, holding onto old memories, and using their imagination. Lieutenant Jimmy Cross’s love for Martha is a sort of coping mechanism, as it is a distraction. He carries a picture of her and fantasizes about her, despite the fact that she does not love him in return. Another form of coping mechanism that the soldiers would use is to carry things that both provided the comforts of home, and served as distractions. Such things included photos, good luck charms, cigarettes, and comic books. One man carried his girlfriend’s pantyhose around his neck; another man, called Ted Lavender, would self medicate as a way of coping with the stresses of war. The men would also joke with each other, in order to make light of their current situation, as humor also can be a useful escape from the horrors of the battlefield.

Reply
yosbel perez
02/26/2013 06:47

In Gary Soto's "Black Hair," what associations, emotions,
or attitudes toward illegal immigrants do you bring to your reading of the text?
Use examples from the text to support your statements.

In Gary Soto’s “Black Hair”, the speaker feels like he does not belong in any race classification. He looks Mexican but does not speak any Spanish so he does not fit in with either ethnic group. In story there is an association with Hispanic immigrants as laborers. There is a strong reference of lower class of work left to the immigrants. Let them do the jobs that others don’t want to, the illegal work that is meant for the lower class. In the text it stated how they had to be hard working people at a tire factory . This factory was refurbishing old tires and selling them as new. The emotions in the text show how the speaker is scared to die poor. He knows that he is destined to be poor but he tries his best not to be . The speaker shows the emotions of struggling with his identity. He does not know what he is anymore , he is neither white or Hispanic . When the INS shows up to the show the illegal aliens run , so he himself runs with them even though he has no need to . That sense of identity confusion is shown throughout the whole story. Illegal aliens are defined by hard labor and constant fear. They have to settle for less for that is all they have. What people don’t understand is that the country most people come from have worse conditions than the jobs illegal immigrants have to endure in this country.

Reply
Tasha Urena-Arredondo
02/26/2013 09:42

We being a product of our environment are partially true. I think that if we live in an environment that is stagnant most of the society in that environment will become stagnant. It’s only the very few that branch out and want more. It’s those that develop ambition that usually venture and want more out of life. Ms. Moore was probably one of those individuals that had those hardships and lived in a difficult environment. She chose to make a difference not only in her life but also on those that wanted the same. Ms. Moore basically is not only worried about the children’s’ future but hers. Ms. Moore knows that these children were going to be our society’s future. I believe this is the reason she wanted to teach these children that there are other things out there than the four corners of their neighborhood block. I think that Ms. Moore also understood that these children’s’ parents are also a product of their environment who were too busy working to provide for them but did not have the time to explain to their children how important it is to better yourself through education.
My mother was married at 15 years old, pregnant, and attending Fordham University. I lived in New York City in the corner of 103 ST. and Central Park West. If you looked to the right side of the building you saw the upper class area. If you looked to the left side of the building it was the drug infested projects. My mother always told me I needed to achieve and aspire to what is at the right side of the building so that I would not endure the hardships that I saw the left side of the building. It was the greatest advice that she has ever given me. I chose not to be a product of my negative environment but I never closed my eyes as to what that environment really is. If I did I probably would have ended up to the left side of the building.

Reply
Mackenson Pierre
02/26/2013 17:48

"Where we are is who we are." said Miss Moore In the story "The Lesson". To begin with, not everybody will agree with this statement, not even a hard working student in a bad neighborhood. One who is always gets to school on time and rarely be late. Also, study everyday and making sure that all of his homework is complete before going to bed. Sometimes the light will go off, but that does not stop him from reading his history book. This is a young kid who later becomes a successful doctor in life. Other kids in his neighborhood spend time standing on the street attacking the innocents ones that have nothing to do with violence. When they got an “F” on their report card there excuse is “things are bad at home, we cannot even eat a good meal”. Compare to the other kids; even though the hard working student’s parents could not afford to pay the light that did not change him with his studies. The point is where we are does not make us who we are. I totally disagree with Miss Moor’s Statement, because it is not the environment that we are in that make us. We chose to be who ever we want to be, and work our way up. Andrew Johnson, who took over when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, grew up in poverty and was never able to go to school. After the death of his father, Andrew had to help out the family in every way that he could. In the situation that he was did not make in think that he will always be poor. He did not choose to be poor, but poverty chose him. It turns out that he becomes the 17th President of the United States. It does not have to be where we are, because we all have a choice on anything we are doing. Sometimes it is because wrong things chose us and by accepting them, make it seem “where we are is what we are”. so I totally disagree with miss Moor statement.

Reply



Leave a Reply

    Author

    About Professor Barletta....
    I have taught at the secondary and post-secondary level for ten years. I have a Master of Arts with a major in English and an ABD in Higher Education. I am the English and Communications Program Director at Keiser University and also work with Service Learning. In addition to teaching, I am currently completing my dissertation at Nova Southeastern University.  

    Archives

    January 2012

    Categories

    All